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Article
June 1931

SYPHILIS: SOME PSYCHOLOGIC ASPECTS OF TREATMENT

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Philadelphia Child Guidance Clinic.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;23(6):1021-1030. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.03880240002001
Abstract

The management of a syphilitic patient presents greater problems than are encountered in the treatment of patients with other infectious diseases. In order to achieve a cure, the patient must submit to a form of treatment which is unpleasant, more unpleasant usually than the symptoms that he presents, and which must be continued long after the last visible signs of the disease have disappeared. Furthermore, because of the highly communicable nature of the infection, the patient must impose many restrictions on himself, at least during the first months of treatment. If he already has exposed his family to the infection, they must be examined, and treated if necessary. Such a procedure requires the patient's unquestioning acceptance of the diagnosis, a realization of the serious condition implied by that diagnosis and a high degree of cooperation over a period of months or years.

THE PATIENT'S REACTION TO THE DIAGNOSIS  Every syphilologist

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