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Article
June 1931

HYPERSENSITIVITY TO TRICHOPHYTIN IN THE CASUAL DERMATOLOGIC PATIENT: A STUDY OF ONE HUNDRED AND TWO CASES

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of Mount Sinai Hospital and of the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;23(6):1041-1044. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.03880240022003
Abstract

The experiments of Bloch,1 demonstrating allergic phenomena of the skin in animals after fungus infections, were soon followed by the observation of trichophytids in human beings by J. Jadassohn.2 Clinical and experimental evidence has shown that these eruptions are akin to the tuberculids, and are secondary to the hematogenic transport of fungi (or possibly also of toxins) to the allergic skin from a primary focus.

A sine qua non for the existence of trichophytids is a positive trichophytin reaction. This has been said to occur usually in the deep inflammatory fungus infections such as kerion celsi or sycosis parasitaria profunda. It has been shown, however, that a positive trichophytin reaction with development of epidermophytids is a frequent occurrence in epidermophytosis of the feet, which is a relatively superficial infection.3 This was confirmed in a large number of cases.4 We are of the opinion that the high

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