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July 1931

HETEROTHALLISM AMONG THE DERMATOPHYTESAN INQUIRY INTO THREE OF THE COMMONER SPECIES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;24(1):22-38. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.01450010027002
Abstract

This work was instigated by a paper written by Weidman entitled "Light from the Botanic Field on Medical Mycologic Problems."1 The phase chiefly concerned was the remarkable morphologic variation within one and the same species of fungus; a variation that still persisted in hanging-drop cultures, even under the carefully controlled and uniform conditions that I have outlined in a preceding report.2 It was thought that a study of heterothallism among the dermatophytes would lead to a better understanding of this variation.

REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Heterothallism may be defined as that property of certain fungi whereby two different cells (hyphae in our work), although identical morphologically, possess such different sexual properties that, on uniting, they can produce a new form. The presence of heterothallism may be demonstrated by taking a pure line strain, that is, a colony derived from a single cell of an organism, say Neurospora

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