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Article
July 1931

THE SENEAR-USHER SYNDROME: A DERMATOSIS COMBINING FEATURES OF LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS AND PEMPHIGUS

Author Affiliations

Assistant, Laboratory of Dermatological Research PHILADELPHIA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;24(1):84-97. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.01450010089006
Abstract

In 1926, Senear and Usher1 published their report of "An Unusual Type of Pemphigus," which included a discussion of eleven cases of a hitherto undescribed clinical syndrome. Briefly, according to the authors' description, the clinical picture embraces features of both lupus erythematosus and pemphigus. The manifestations of the former disease involve the scalp and face, either with typical discoid patches and "carpet-tack" scales, or with an inflammatory reaction suggesting a severely congested seborrheic dermatitis. The lesions of pemphigus occur on the trunk, usually in the seborrheic areas, and consist of flaccid bullae that rupture readily and develop into areas of crusted, oozing dermatitis or into an inflammatory papule with a thick, greasy or even keratotic scale and crust. The lesions usually involute spontaneously and leave pigmented patches. The symptoms are mild; itching may occur, but the course is usually relatively benign. The cases in the original Senear-Usher group

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