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Article
July 1931

TUBERCULOSIS FROM DIRECT INOCULATION WITH AUTOPSY KNIFE: REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

Clinical Professor of Medicine (Dermatology), Stanford School of Medicine SAN FRANCISCO

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;24(1):98-100. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.01450010103007
Abstract

The date of accidental inoculation and the course of events in this case being definitely known, it is felt that a report would be of interest.

CASE REPORT

An intern, aged 25, while assisting at an autopsy on a patient with tuberculosis on July 8, 1929, pricked his left index finger (flexor aspect) with the knife. Two weeks later, he noticed a nodule the size of a pea at the site of the injury. He incised the nodule, but there was no pus. Within a few days, painful axillary (left) adenopathy developed. The epitrochlear glands did not become involved. The axillary glands slowly enlarged, and five months later became soft and fluctuating. The primary lesion constantly remained nodular and never became verrucose or pustular, but a very small amount of serum could be readily expressed. There had been no rise in temperature.

At the time of examination, the

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