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Article
September 1931

THE SEBACEOUS GLANDS: THEIR HISTOPATHOLOGY AND RÔLE IN DISEASES OF THE SKIN

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;24(3):353-370. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.01450010362001
Abstract

The discovery of the sebaceous glands has been attributed to Gurlt.1 As early as 1846, Horner2 commented on the fact that "the sebaceous organs furnish the oily exhalations which lubricate the surface of the skin, give linen when worn a long time a greasy appearance and cause the water in which we bathe to assemble in drops on the surface of the body rather than to wet it uniformly. This humour produces a rancid, disagreeable smell from the surface of such persons as do not resort to ablutions of the whole skin from time to time."

Since then, Erasmus Wilson3 and innumerable others have added to knowledge on the subject, but many gaps still remain unfilled.

EMBRYOLOGY

The sebaceous glands develop from the epidermis, but some difference in their evolution exists, depending on whether they are derived directly from the tegmentary layer or secondarily from the

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