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Article
September 1931

SYMPTOMATIC AND ASYMPTOMATIC RINGWORM OF THE FEET: A REPORT BASED ON A STUDY OF ONE THOUSAND SEVENTY-THREE CONSECUTIVE CASES IN THE DISPENSARY, COVERING A PERIOD OF ONE YEAR

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;24(3):430-445. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.01450010439011
Abstract

That ringworm of the feet is widespread throughout the nation is recognized. How widely distributed it is and how it spreads are matters both of importance and dispute, even if they are not as vital as the questions of prophylaxis and treatment. It is our purpose in this paper to discuss some phases of the prevalence of the condition, and perhaps to shed some new light thereon. The treatment, concerning which special studies are being conducted, will be discussed in a subsequent paper.

Epidermophytosis of the feet (synonyms: epidermomycosis, dermatophytosis, dermatomycosis and eczematoid ringworm of the feet) was given scant consideration and occupied a position of little importance in dermatology before the World War. This was probably due not so much to the fact that it was not then prevalent as to the fact that the true nature of this disease was not generally recognized. The importance now attached

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