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Article
December 1931

THE INTERPRETATION OF THE DERMOLUETIN REACTION IN SYPHILISEXPERIENCE WITH THE KOLMER ORGANIC EXTRACT

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1931;24(6):937-953. doi:10.1001/archderm.1931.01450010952001
Abstract

The introduction of the tuberculin test by Pirquet nearly twenty-five years ago marked the beginning of an extensive research on the question as to whether or not the skin of persons afflicted with certain infectious diseases develops an allergic hypersensitiveness to the infective agent, and whether this phenomenon may be utilized in diagnosis. Mallein, typhoidin and streptothricin are examples of a group of preparations devised for the detection of this property that have become useful aids in diagnosis. Of more doubtful utility is luetin, the subject of this report.

Even before the cause of syphilis was known, certain investigators, notably Finger and Landsteiner,1 had sought, but with indifferent results, to elicit a cutaneous reaction in this disease, using some syphilitic organ as a grafting material. Following the discovery of Spirochaeta pallida, Neisser,2 in 1908, took up the serious study of a cutireaction in syphilis. Tedeschi,

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