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Article
March 1932

THE EFFECT OF ARSENIC ON RABBITS: MICROCHEMICAL STUDIES FOLLOWING THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE ARSPHENAMINES AND TRYPARSAMIDE

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1932;25(3):419-438. doi:10.1001/archderm.1932.01450020435001
Abstract

Since the introduction of arsphenamine and neoarsphenamine by Ehrlich, information regarding the causes of accidents following their use has been sought by laboratory research and by clinical investigation. The more recent introduction of silver arsphenamine, sulpharsphenamine and tryparsamide has intensified the desire of scientists to learn more regarding the toxic and therapeutic effects of all of the organic arsenicals used in the treatment for syphilis. The use of extremely large doses of tryparsamide over long periods with almost a total lack of toxic reactions, except for the effect on the optic nerve, has led to much speculation regarding the chemical action of tryparsamide in the body and its apparent affinity for certain organs and tissues. Owing to the fact that one of us had used microchemical methods for several years for the demonstration of arsenic in tissue, particularly with reference to arsenical keratoses, arsenical pigmentation of the skin and

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