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Article
May 1932

LOCAL RESPONSES TO HISTAMINE IN NORMAL SKIN, IN DERMATOPHYTOSIS, IN ALOPECIA AREATA AND IN SCLERODERMA

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1932;25(5):840-846. doi:10.1001/archderm.1932.01450020866008
Abstract

There are features of certain dermatoses which indicate that local alterations of cutaneous circulation may be concerned in their etiology. This paper contains the investigative study of the cutaneous circulation in three of these conditions, namely, epidermophytosis of the feet, alopecia areata and scleroderma. The work is based on the urticarial reaction of the skin to histamine applied intradermally, and the results are compared with those obtained from one hundred normal control cases.

The histamine wheal was first reported by Eppinger1 in 1913. It was studied further by Sollmann and Pilcher2 in 1917. Dale and Richards3 made an extensive investigation of the pharmacologic action of histamine, and concluded that it caused dilatation of the capillaries by decreasing the tone of these vessels. Lewis4 very ingeniously has shown that the normal skin gives a constant reaction to histamine, characterized by the formation of a central wheal

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