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Article
September 1932

DERMATITIS GANGRAENOSA INFANTUM IN THE COURSE OF SCARLET FEVER

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1932;26(3):428-434. doi:10.1001/archderm.1932.01450030426005
Abstract

Disseminated areas of gangrene of the skin occurring in the course of scarlet fever is an extremely rare complication. Crocker,1 in 1887, was the first to call attention to the occurrence of this condition spontaneously or in diseases other than in varicella. To quote Crocker: "The diagnosis is not difficult with or without a history of varicella: the occurrence of numerous gangrenous ulcers in a young child, or even of deep ulceration beginning as a pustule, enlarging, drying into a scab in the center, and then ulcerating, form a group of symptoms quite unmistakable." In view of the unsettled etiology and the possible allergic basis, together with recent experimental work that seems to throw some light on this condition, we deem it of value to report a case.

REPORT OF A CASE

History.—S. A., a healthy boy of 5 years, gave a negative history, with the exception

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