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Article
December 1932

MICROSCOPIC SLIDE PRECIPITATION TEST FOR DIAGNOSIS OF SYPHILIS WITH CHANCRE FLUIDINCLUDING A COMPARISON OF THE KLINE, WASSERMANN, KAHN AND HINTON BLOOD SERUM TESTS IN ONE HUNDRED AND TEN PATIENTS WITH SUSPECTED SYPHILITIC SORES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1932;26(6):965-969. doi:10.1001/archderm.1932.01450030967002
Abstract

In the present status of our knowledge it is fair to state that the successful cure of syphilis in the largest percentage of cases is a matter chiefly of very early diagnosis. The ideal period for successful therapy is up to the fifth or sixth week after the infection. During this period, the serologic tests of the blood are as a rule negative. The diagnosis at this time therefore devolves on finding the spirochetes in the lesions or glands. For a variety of reasons, however, this often fails. This may be due to the fact that the lesions are too old or have been contaminated or treated with some chemical prior to the examination. All these factors tend to vitiate the results. Moreover, Spirocheta pallida, while readily recognized by the experienced, is likely to be missed or mistaken by the inexperienced. This difficulty has been recognized by many. Stokes1 expressed it well when

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