[Skip to Navigation]
Article
May 1933

LYMPHOGRANULOMA INGUINALE (DURAND-NICOLAS-FAVRE DISEASE): PRELIMINARY REPORT OF THREE CASES IN OMAHA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1933;27(5):778-782. doi:10.1001/archderm.1933.01450040787008
Abstract

The fourth venereal disease, most often spoken of as lymphogranuloma inguinale, or Durand-Nicolas-Favre disease, has been recognized as a definite clinical entity in Europe since 1913.

Under the caption ``Nontuberculous Granulomatous Lymphadenitis,'' Hansmann,1 in 1924, reported the first probable cases of this disease recognized in this country, from the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital. Two of the patients were men and two women.

In 1926, Pardo-Costello2 reported three cases in Cuba, all in men.

Hillsman, Wilshusen and Zimmerman3 encountered this disease in a white man, aged 73, who had been sexually exposed to a Negress supposed to be ``diseased''; this case occurred in New Haven, Conn.

In New York, a probable case, in a Negro, aged 27, was reported by Gross4 in May, 1930. Wise5 had a patient, a man, aged 21. in whom lymphogranuloma inguinale was proved to be present by Sulzberger, by means

Add or change institution
×