[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 35.173.48.53. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 1933

AINHUM: REPORT OF A CASE WITH ROENTGENOLOGIC FINDINGS AND REVIEW OF LITERATURE

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1933;27(5):783-793. doi:10.1001/archderm.1933.01450040792009
Abstract

Ainhum, as described in textbooks and various articles, consists in the formation of a narrow strip of hardened skin, the so-called ``constricting ring." which gradually involves the whole circumference of the little toe, on a level with the digitoplantar fold. This constriction forms a deep circular furrow which gradually increases in depth and length and follows the absorption of the tissues, including the bone, underneath the ring, and as a result either of injury or of gangrene terminates in spontaneous amputation of the portion of the toe distal to the ring. The distal part of the toe is usually enlarged to two or three times its normal size, and before falling off assumes the form of a tumor attached by a pedicle to the rest of the toe. The amputation takes place at the second or third joint or through the phalanx. The ring is located near the proximal

×