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Article
October 1933

PSEUDOXANTHOMA ELASTICUM AND ANGIOID STREAKS: A DISEASE SYNDROME WITH COMMENTS ON THE LITERATURE AND THE REPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology and the Department of Ophthalmology of the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University, Dr. George M. MacKee and Dr. Martin Cohen, directors, respectively.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1933;28(4):546-556. doi:10.1001/archderm.1933.01460040089011
Abstract

Pseudoxanthoma elasticum, known as an entity since Darier's communication1 in 1896, was previously considered a variant of the true xanthomas. Before Darier's report, Rigal2 and Balzer3 observed degeneration of the elastic tissues, but they interpreted this finding as part of the xanthomatous process. Darier's classic description and pathologic study have since been corroborated and added to by many observers. Among the reports of this disease, Surmont's thesis4 is probably the most complete. Throne and Goodman's study5 included a review of the literature and a report of two cases; it is one of the best articles on pseudoxanthoma elasticum in the American literature.

Angioid streaks of the retina were first described by Pflange6 in 1892. Some writers prefer to associate Doyne's name7 with the initial characterization, since he reported a case in 1889 in which an injury to both eyes resulted in a picture

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