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Article
March 1934

LXVI.—LIPIDS OF THE SKIN: INFLUENCE OF SOME FACTORS ON THE ALBINO RAT

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1934;29(3):342-350. doi:10.1001/archderm.1934.01460090011002
Abstract

In a recent review of the subject of skin lipids1 it was pointed out that most tissues of the animal body have been found to maintain a remarkably constant level of certain lipids, particularly cholesterol and phospholipids, in spite of extreme changes in the nutritional status of the animal. This fact suggests that the life and normal function of the cells of a tissue require a definite level of these lipids.

Recent reports in the literature indicate that the skin may be an exceptional tissue since it has apparently been demonstrated that the cholesterol content at least can vary between rather wide limits. Buschke and Markus2 have reported that cholesterol-containing lipids were greatly diminished or entirely absent in the skins of rats with alopecia produced by thallium acetate. Roffo has found a marked increase in the cholesterol of the skin of rats exposed to sunlight or ultraviolet rays

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