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Article
April 1934

IODIZED TABLE SALT AS AN ETIOLOGIC FACTOR IN IODODERMA

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1934;29(4):529-536. doi:10.1001/archderm.1934.01460100047004
Abstract

The use of salt as a flavoring agent for food dates from early antiquity. The founder of Buddhism, Arddhia Chiddi, a native of Capila near Nepaul, mentioned it in his "verbal instructions." Moses, in the Book of Job, written in 1520 B. C., asked: "Can anything which is unsavory be eaten without salt?" As Moses was brought up in the court of Pharaoh, he may have derived his knowledge of the use of salt from the early Egyptians. The ancient Jews obtained their supply of salt from the Dead Sea. With the progress of civilization and the refinement of the culinary arts, salt became more and more of a kitchen necessity.

Iodine, discovered by Courtois of France in 1812, was first combined with table salt by M. Grange of Geneva, Switzerland, and used in the treatment of goiter as early as 1840. The use of iodized salt in this country

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