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Article
May 1934

THROMBOPENIA IN ACUTE DISSEMINATED LUPUS ERYTHEMATOSUS

Author Affiliations

OAKLAND, CALIF.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1934;29(5):700-702. doi:10.1001/archderm.1934.01460110058008
Abstract

Instances of the extremely acute, frequently fatal exanthematic type of lupus erythematosus are seen so infrequently by one observer that I feel justified in reporting my hematologic finding in three such cases. This consisted of marked thrombopenia. In case 1 the thrombocytes varied in number somewhat in proportion to the clinical condition of the patient. During periods of clinical improvement the thrombocytes increased, only to decrease again when the patient became worse. In the two fatal cases the thrombocytes reached a low point before death.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  Mrs. M. E., aged 28, first noted violaceous macules and papules on her finger-tips in 1929. Since that time they had appeared and disappeared intermittently. On June 1, 1932, her face was sunburned. The burn failed to disappear and gradually spread, involving the whole face and neck. Since the onset of this acute phase she had suffered from arthritic pains.

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