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Article
June 1934

DISORDERS OF THE FEET AS A CAUSE OF RESISTANT ECZEMATOID RINGWORM: THEIR INFLUENCE ON THE AMOUNT OF SWEATING OF THE FEET

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1934;29(6):887-889. doi:10.1001/archderm.1934.01460120084008

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Abstract

For some time I have been struck with the observation that some patients with resistant cases of eczematoid ringworm infection also have orthopedic disorders of the feet or wear imperfectly fitting shoes. In several cases, correction of these difficulties resulted in a speedy eradication of a previously resistant dermatitis and relief from hyperhidrosis, or both. Many investigators have felt that the disposition toward ringworm infection has some connection with excessive perspiration. My own experiments, previously reported in a series on the self-sterilization powers of the skin, seem to substantiate this view.

To obtain quantitative facts for my empirical observations, I took the patients to the laboratory. Two objectives were sought: (1) to ascertain the amount of sweat secreted by the sole before and after correction of flatfootedness (pes planus) and (2) to produce mild discomfort of the foot by shortening the shoe and observing the effect on the amount of

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