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Article
July 1934

PEMPHIGUS: EVIDENCE IN SUPPORT OF A BACTEREMIA AS AN EXPLANATION OF CERTAIN TERMINAL CHANGES IN THE BLOOD PICTURE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1934;30(1):22-29. doi:10.1001/archderm.1934.01460130030006
Abstract

In a case of pemphigus vegetans, Kissmeyer1 observed a uniform diminution in the number of eosinophils during the entire course of the disease. Over a period of four months the eosinophil count fell progressively from 42.5 to 1.5 per cent. The patient died twenty days later. This work of Kissmeyer was repeated in another case of pemphigus vegetans and in a case of pemphigus vulgaris; in both cases the patients were admitted to the New York Hospital in the latter part of 1932. The following are summaries of the histories of the two patients:

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.—  M. Z., a Hungarian Jewess, aged 49, complained of redness and itching of the eyes and soreness of the gums in April 1932. Two months later the throat and then the vagina became particularly sore. She entered the outpatient department of the New York Hospital on Oct. 28, 1932, having

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