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Article
November 1934

DERMATITIS VENENATA FROM RHUS TOXIDODENDRON: REPORT OF UNUSUAL CASES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1934;30(5):645-646. doi:10.1001/archderm.1934.01460170037003
Abstract

Between May 29 and June 19, 1934, eight boys, ranging in age from 10 to 13 years, came to the outpatient department for cutaneous diseases of the C. V. Chapin Hospital with dermatitis of the forearms characterized by blisters of a sharp black color, varying in size from that of a pinhead to that of a pea. Some of the lesions were broken, and some were in the linear formation usually seen in dermatitis caused by poison ivy. The black, blistered areas were conspicuously distinct on a background of moderately reddened skin (figure). The itching and discomfort were moderate. The duration was two days.

The first question asked the patients was whether a solution of silver nitrate or some other chemical had been applied to the raw surface. They said that no chemicals had been used. They stated that they had whipped one another with branches of Rhus toxidodendron.1

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