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Article
November 1934

THE SAFETY OF LUMBAR PUNCTURE FOR AMBULATORY PATIENTS

Author Affiliations

SAN FRANCISCO

From the Division of Dermatology and Syphilology of the Department of Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1934;30(5):692-696. doi:10.1001/archderm.1934.01460170084009
Abstract

During the past few months there arose the question of performing lumbar puncture in the outpatient department of the clinic for cutaneous and syphilitic disorders at the Stanford University Hospital. Heretofore all of the patients who submitted to this procedure had been hospitalized for at least twenty-four hours. It was realized, however, that to insist on this procedure would result in my being forced to forego valuable serologic control of treatment. The procedure in ambulatory patients was therefore established and has now been in use for more than a year, with results to be described later.

Soon after Quincke1 first introduced the operation of lumbar puncture reports of accidents began to appear. By 1915 Schönbeck2 was able to collect reports of 71 fatalities following puncture, a great preponderance being among patients with increased intracranial pressure. Excluding patients with tumor of the brain and other obvious causes of increased

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