[Skip to Navigation]
Article
December 1934

ESTHIOMENE, A LATE MANIFESTATION OF LYMPHOPATHIA VENEREA: (LYMPHOGRANULOMATOSIS INGUINALIS)

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, Mount Sinai Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1934;30(6):831-836. doi:10.1001/archderm.1934.01460180073011
Abstract

Although subacute inguinal adenitis has been on record for centuries and has been described under various names, it was not until 1913 and again in 1922 that Durand, Nicholas and Favre,1 in their classic descriptions, pointed out the individuality of the condition and indicated its probable venereal origin. They termed the disease "lymphogranulomatose inguinale subaiguë." The interest aroused in the investigation of this disease is manifest by the voluminous literature which has accumulated, especially since 1925, when Frei2 announced his discovery of a specific intracutaneous test, which aided greatly in establishing the identity of the disease and in determining its presence in atypical sites and forms, particularly in women. Previous to this, it had been accepted as a rarity in women.

In 1932, Wolf and Sulzberger3 suggested the use of the name "lymphopathia venerea" to replace the original and more popular name, "lymphogranulomatosis inguinalis," because the older

×