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Article
March 1935

FLUORESCENCE OF FUNGUS COLONIES WITH FILTERED ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION (WOOD'S FILTER): AN AID IN DETERMINATION OF SPECIES: PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University, under the direction of Dr. George Miller MacKee.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1935;31(3):329-332. doi:10.1001/archderm.1935.01460210040004
Abstract

Since Margarot and Devèze's first report1 drew attention to the fluorescence observable when hair infected with fungi is examined under ultraviolet radiation filtered through Wood's filter, the value of this type of radiation as an aid in the diagnosis of tinea capitis and as a help in determining the cure has become generally recognized. While it is helpful in the diagnosis of other dermatologic conditions, its chief clinical use has been found in cases of ringworm of the scalp, and a number of articles by observers in various parts of the world have attested to its worth. The use of such filtered ultraviolet radiation in detecting fungus carriers, both human and animal, was recently described by Davidson, Gregory and Birt.2 It appears, however, that little attention has been given to the question of the fluorescence of fungus cultures.

That fungi in culture fluoresce was first noted by Margarot

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