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Article
July 1935

EXCRETION OF MERCURY AFTER CLINICAL INTRAMUSCULAR AND INTRAVENOUS INJECTIONS

Author Affiliations

In Collaboration With; CLEVELAND

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1935;32(1):1-48. doi:10.1001/archderm.1935.01470010004001
Abstract

When mercury is administered to a patient, a part generally remains unabsorbed, at least for a time; that which is absorbed circulates through the blood, lymph and tissues, and is then either excreted or deposited and stored in the tissues. This stored mercury may remain in the body for indefinite periods without producing any perceptible toxic or therapeutic effects, for soon after the active absorption of the drug has stopped, but while comparatively large quantities of mercury are not being excreted, the toxic phenomena disappear and the therapeutic effects decline, so that another course of administration must be started to maintain the antisyphilitic action. It may be suggested that the stored mercury has already combined with the tissue proteins, perhaps in insoluble form, so that it does not react further and is therefore really inactive. However this may be, it seems that the actively circulating mercury is chiefly, if

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