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Article
July 1935

AN EPIDEMIC OF RINGWORM DUE TO EPIDERMOPHYTON FLOCCOSUM (INGUINALE)

Author Affiliations

SEATTLE; NEW YORK

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1935;32(1):62-68. doi:10.1001/archderm.1935.01470010065004
Abstract

Considerable attention has been given recently to epidemics and the incidence of ringworm of the toes and feet. Epidemics of ringworm of the scalp are also well known, while familial outbreaks of ringworm of the body are very frequent. One often hears reports that ringworm of the groins is prevalent in certain gymnasiums, but precise knowledge of such outbreaks seems lacking.

Sabouraud,1 in his textbook, described an epidemic of ringworm of the groins which occurred in a Parisian college in 1906 and which involved twenty-three men. He also referred to several different out-breaks of the infection, among them one described by Dubreuilh in 1894, in which twenty young men were affected. From his patients Sabouraud isolated a fungus to which he gave the name Epidermophyton inguinale. Castellani, working independently at that time, named the organism Trichophyton cruris.

It is of interest to note that several years previously,

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