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Article
August 1935

MODIFIED COMPOSITION OF IODOBISMITOL: RESULTS ON LOCAL IRRITATION

Author Affiliations

With the Assistance of P. S. Pouppirt, M.D., and M. R. Somers, M.D. SAN FRANCISCO

From the Department of Pharmacology and the Division of Neuropsychiatry, Stanford University School of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1935;32(2):284-287. doi:10.1001/archderm.1935.01470020106010
Abstract

Experiences in the use of iodobismitol (N. N. R.) during the past three years indicated the desirability of making a small change in composition in order to facilitate administration of the product, especially to sensitive patients. Most patients experience an initial sensation of burning at the site of injection, but a certain proportion of patients complain of sustained pain and apparently cannot tolerate the product. The following composition is proposed as the most satisfactory of a number tried: sodium iodobismuthite, 6 per cent, saligenin, 4 per cent, and sodium iodide, 12 per cent, dissolved in propylene glycol. Saligenin is a local anesthetic and practically nonirritant and nontoxic.1 Propylene glycol is substituted for ethylene glycol in order to eliminate the potentialities of systemic toxicity from ethylene glycol. The modified preparation of iodobismitol, which is designated "iodobismitol with saligenin," has a greater viscosity than ordinary iodobismitol owing to

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