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Article
September 1935

CLINICAL SPECTROSCOPYADVANTAGES AND PHYSICAL PRINCIPLES OF THE SPECTROGRAPH AND TECHNIC IN TAKING SPECIMEN FOR BIOSPECTROMETRIC ANALYSIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Skin and Cancer Unit, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University, Dr. George Miller MacKee, Director.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1935;32(3):385-393. doi:10.1001/archderm.1935.01470030027004
Abstract

Clinical spectroscopy is a new method of attack in biologic research. This method has supplanted the usual analytic procedures by the use of an instrument that gives both qualitative and quantitative data in one analysis, namely, the spectrograph. The analysis of connective tissue for metallic constituents furnishes data of more clinical significance than the usual analysis of excretory products for toxic metals.1 As a means of identifying this test we coined the word "biospectrometric." By this term we designate a qualitative and quantitative analysis for the metallic constituents in differentiated and undifferentiated mesoderm. The dermal biopsy specimen is obtained with a 0.47 cm. punch and weighs approximately 0.025 Gm. The technic is as follows:

The site for taking the specimen is the area over the suprapatellar pad of fat because the samples are more uniform in quantity. This area is cleansed with an alcohol sponge. The central part, about

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