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Article
November 1935

REPRODUCTION OF PATHOLOGIC SPECIMENS IN DERMATOLOGIC PRACTICE BY MAKING WAX MOULAGES

Author Affiliations

SAN DIEGO, CALIF.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1935;32(5):735-738. doi:10.1001/archderm.1935.01470050031004
Abstract

Many agents are used to reproduce pathologic changes in living tissue, such as schematic drawings in black and white, photographs, cuts, colored plates and motion pictures. Needless to say, the most realistic means of demonstrating these changes would be to excise a lesion and study it grossly in situ. However, this method is unsatisfactory because the pathologic details which characterize the growth of the lesion soon disappear when it is removed from its host. Even the most carefully preserved pathologic specimens lose their definition and color, as well as their consistency and size, shortly after being immersed in preservatives.

The art of making wax moulages has been practiced in one form or another for many years, especially in Europe. This procedure portrays exactly the true pathologic changes because it affords an exact reproduction, in detail, of the lesion standing out in bold relief. With the help of the

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