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Article
November 1935

QUANTITATIVE DISTRIBUTION OF SILVER IN THE BODY OR ITS PHYSIOPATHOLOGIC RETENTION AS A RECIPROCAL OF THE CAPILLARY SYSTEM

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Skin and Cancer Unit, New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University; George Miller MacKee, Director.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1935;32(5):775-780. doi:10.1001/archderm.1935.01470050071011
Abstract

Metallic retention has been defined as the physiopathologic disposition of metallic elements around the capillaries of the blood vascular system. The reciprocity between the capillary and the metallic distribution not only results in the metals being placed contiguous to the cellular elements of various vital organs and tissues but implies the vastness of the area for the retention of metallic constituents by the body. This interpretation disregards the mode of entry into the lymph or the blood stream but considers the dispensation of a metal as a function of its chemical and physical properties. When the biochemical state of a metal is colloidal, whether it is absorbed as an extraneous contamination or administered therapeutically, the retention has been ascribed to the physiologic rôle of cellular elements, principally the connective tissue cells or histiocytes. The excretion of colloidal metallic elements has also been interpreted as a cellular phenomenon.1

When it

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