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Article
January 1936

LOCALIZED (LICHEN) AMYLOIDOSIS OF THE SKIN: REPORT OF TWO CASES, WITH VITAL STAINING OF THE AMYLOID NODULES BY CONGO RED INJECTED INTRACUTANEOUSLY OR SUBCUTANEOUSLY

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Dermatology, Rush Medical College CHICAGO

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1936;33(1):85-98. doi:10.1001/archderm.1936.01470070088008
Abstract

Amyloidosis of the skin may be separated into several groups which present more or less classic findings. The clinical picture of lichen amyloidosis, typified in the cases here reported, is now well enough known that when signs of this type are observed the presence of the condition should be suspected in most cases and the diagnosis proved by biopsy or by vital staining with congo red after intracutaneous or subcutaneous injection, as was done in the cases reported here. Amyloidosis of the skin and muscle is, according to Michelson and Lynch1 equally characteristic, but strangely enough classic generalized amyloidosis is seldom if ever accompanied by cutaneous lesions. Deposits of amyloid in senile lesions such as those seen in cases of keratosis senilis have been adequately discussed by Freudenthal.2 Other as yet unclassified types of localized amyloidosis occur.

To Koenigstein3 must go the credit for calling the

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