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Article
May 1936

LYMPHOGRANULOMA INGUINALE: II. THE CULTIVATION OF THE VIRUS IN MICE AND ITS USE IN THE PREPARATION OF FREI ANTIGEN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the New York Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1936;33(5):853-864. doi:10.1001/archderm.1936.01470110073006
Abstract

The object of this work was to culture in the brains of mice a virus of lymphogranuloma inguinale. The work was undertaken, first, to study the properties of the virus and, second, to make use of such a virus for the preparation of Frei antigen.

The first investigators to discover that the virus of lymphogranuloma inguinale is transmissible to mice via the intracerebral route were Levaditi, Ravaut and Schoen.1 They employed an emulsion of lymphogranulomatous monkey brain as the original inoculum. They concluded, however, that the mouse is not constantly susceptible to the virus of lymphogranuloma inguinale, as not all the animals inoculated with the same material and by the same route showed signs of the disease.

The following year Findlay2 transmitted eleven strains of virus to mice, the primary inoculum being either human lymphogranulomatous material or monkey brain. He found that strains of the virus varied

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