[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1936

SPHACELODERMAREPORT OF A CASE OF UNUSUAL PHAGEDENIC ULCERATION OF THE SKIN, SUBCUTANEOUS TISSUE AND MUSCLE OF THE CHEST WALL

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1936;33(6):977-986. doi:10.1001/archderm.1936.01470120028005
Abstract

Gangrene of the skin1 (sphaceloderma) may be single or multiple, acute or chronic, local or general (some types are peculiar to certain areas),2 symmetrical or asymmetrical, small or extensive. Gangrene may be a sequela to one of a variety of conditions, or it may be spontaneous.3

Crocker stated: "Single gangrenous patches, often of large size, are met with in infants and young children, both spontaneously and as a result of infectious fevers. They start as a vesicle, pustule or bulla."

Gangrenous lesions caused by the ingestion of iodides were reported by R. Parker in a girl aged 10 years and by Audrey in a woman aged 47. Wende reported a fatal case, in which bullous lesions developed in a chronic ulcer on the leg. These subsequently became gangrenous. Streptococci, staphylococci, diplococci and bacilli were found in the bullae and in the gangrenous lesions during

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×