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Article
January 1937

WILLIAM ALLEN PUSEY—THE CITIZEN

Author Affiliations

President, A Century of Progress CHICAGO

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;35(1):19-20. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01470190022007

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Abstract

"Does your doctor know anything—I don't mean about medicine but about things in general, is he a man of information and good sense?" once asked an old practitioner. "If he does not know anything but medicine the chance is he does not know that."

These words are taken from "The Golden Age" by Mark Twain and Charles Dudley Warner. They seem to apply in a double sense to Dr. Pusey. He is as conspicuous for information and good sense in his activities as a citizen as he is distinguished in medical circles for sound knowledge and wide service.

There is no better title to the claim of good citizenship than the record of a devoted service to the medical science, and if, in addition to giving conscientious care to patients, a physician in any community concerns himself about the public health and the enactment and enforcement of laws and

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