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Article
February 1937

INFLUENCE OF AVITAMINOSIS A ON EXPERIMENTALLY PRODUCED CUTANEOUS INFECTIONS IN RATS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

This research was aided by a grant from the Faculty Research Committee of the University of Pennsylvania.

From the Department of Physiological Chemistry, D. Wright Wilson, Ph.D., Director, and the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology, John H. Stokes, M.D., Director, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;35(2):247-250. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01470200047005
Abstract

The question of an increased susceptibility of the skin to infection in avitaminosis A has been the subject of much discussion. Frazier and Hu1 noted that pyogenic dermatosis occurred frequently as a late phenomenon in patients suffering from this deficiency. McCoy2 in studying vitamin A deficiency in young albino rats found that animals with this disorder exhibited a definitely lowered resistance to Trichinella spiralis administered orally. Furthermore, in the rats with vitamin A deficiency any immunity to a second inoculation failed to develop, whereas controls were rendered completely immune by one inoculation. Workman,3 Green and Mellanby,4 Boynton and Bradford5 and others have also noted that in rats with vitamin A deficiency there was a general lack of resistance to experimental infections in various body structures other than the skin. MacKay6 in a large clinical study attempted to determine the effect of prophylactic treatment with

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