[Skip to Navigation]
Article
February 1937

ERUPTION RESEMBLING LICHEN SCROFULOSORUM COINCIDENT WITH NONTUBERCULOUS PULMONARY DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Dermatological Department of the Mount Sinai Hospital, service of Dr. Isadore Rosen.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;35(2):255-263. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01470200055007
Abstract

Although lichen scrofulosorum is the oldest known tuberculous eruption, many phases of the clinical and pathologic conceptions of this disorder are still controversial. It is widely accepted that the cutaneous manifestation represents an expression of hematogenous dissemination of tubercle bacilli or their toxins during the so-called secondary stage described by Ranke.1 In agreement with this point of view are the many observations indicating the preponderance of cutaneous lesions in children, who, as a class, are most prone to bacillemia or toxemia of this type (tuberculosis of the lymph nodes). The problems presented in the evaluation of the data culled from the literature may be classified conveniently, for the purposes of this report, into three categories: clinical picture, histologic picture and internal medical aspects.

1. Clinical Picture. The morphologic attributes of lichen scrofulosorum may be imitated closely by a host of dermatoses, and the differential diagnosis may in

×