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Article
February 1937

ALOPECIA AREATA ARTIFICIALLY PRODUCED BY INTRAVENOUS INJECTION OF QUININE HYDROCHLORIDE AND ETHYL CARBAMATE (URETHANE)

Author Affiliations

Englewood, N. J. Associate Dermatologist, Englewood Hospital

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;35(2):285-286. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01470200085011

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Abstract

A case of alopecia areata in which the lesions were artificially produced by intravenous injections of quinine hydrochloride and ethyl carbamate (urethane) is reported. The injections were given for obliteration of varicose veins, and the discovery of lesions of alopecia areata was accidental. In my opinion this case points to the sympatheticotonic origin of alopecia areata.

REPORT OF A CASE

Mrs. E. B., aged 32, had one child. The family and the past personal history were irrelevant. The patient had never had any disorder of the skin or scalp, and the general physical and laboratory examinations gave negative results. In May 1934 the patient was given an injection of 2 cc. of quinine hydrochloride and ethyl carbamate to obliterate a varicosity on the right leg. No further injections were given. In May 1936 she returned with another small varicosity on another part of the right leg. She was again given

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