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Article
June 1937

PERSISTENT SINUS TRACTS OF DENTAL ORIGIN

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;35(6):1062-1073. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01470240054004
Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to call attention to a condition well known to members of the dental profession and to oral surgeons but apparently not readily recognized by dermatologists. As far as I can ascertain there is nothing in the dermatologic literature regarding this subject. I refer to a peculiar but striking granulomatous lesion which occurs about the gums, the face and the neck and which represents one end of a persistent sinus tract. The other end of this sinus usually originates in the apical abscess of a tooth but may take its origin in any osteomyelitic process of the jaw.

REPORT OF CASES

Case 1.—J. C., aged 20, an American of Czechoslovakian descent, was first seen at the Santa Rita Clinic on Feb. 1, 1934. He complained of a lesion on the chin of two years' duration. He stated that the condition began with a swelling

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