[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1937

LYMPHATIC LEUKEMIAREPORT OF A CASE APPARENTLY LIMITED TO THE SKIN, SUPERFICIAL LYMPHATIC GLANDS AND BLOOD STREAM

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;36(1):1-13. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01480010005001
Abstract

Leukemic infiltration of the skin has been described innumerable times, and the diversified clinical manifestations with which the pathologic process may be associated form a group of dermatoses that so far have defied clear classification. The lymphatic form is the most common, and it is in cases of this form that apparently similar infiltrations of the skin may produce, or occur concomitantly with, a varied array of diagnostic entities. Recently there has been a tendency to group these diseases under one diagnostic term—the lymphoblastomas —and merely to describe the attendant clinical manifestations. Several workers1 have included under the term lymphoblastoma such conditions as lymphatic leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, mycosis fungoides and lymphosarcoma—to mention only those most usually considered as interrelated.

When the supposedly pathognomonic blood picture of lymphatic leukemia is present in a patient showing histologic evidence of cutaneous infiltration, the diagnosis of lymphatic leukemia associated with leukaemia cutis is

×