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Article
July 1937

CLINICAL SPECTROSCOPY: REPORT OF A CASE OF A PUSTULAR DERMATITIS FOLLOWING FLUORIDE MEDICATION FOR PSORIASIS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Division of Dermatology and Syphilology, Skin and Cancer Unit of the New York Post-Graduate Medical School and Hospital, Columbia University, Dr. George M. MacKee, Director.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;36(1):26-30. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01480010030004
Abstract

Cases of dermatitis following medication with sodium fluoride have been observed. The primary lesion was a follicular pustule occurring by predilection where the sebaceous and sweat glands are the most abundant, namely, on the head, neck, chest and back. Objectively the eruption was indistinguishable from that following the ingestion of bromides or iodides. The first pustules began to appear a week or ten days after treatment with sodium fluoride in doses varying between 0.05 and 0.125 Gm.

The circumstance which indicated sodium fluoride as the cause was that all therapeutic attempts to affect a nickel retention in psoriasis in the light of any clinical changes were futile.1 In spite of this, however, another suggestion for studying this dermatosis evolved from the fact that the nickel ion was utilized as a catalyst for the hydrogenation or "hardening" of various vegetable oils. As it was suspected that the degree of saturation

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