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Article
July 1937

FATE AND ACTIVITY OF AUTOGRAFTS AND HOMOGRAFTS OF SKIN IN WHITE RATS

Author Affiliations

CLINTON, N. Y.

From the Biological Laboratory, Hamilton College.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;36(1):53-56. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01480010057009
Abstract

A recent review by Trusler and Cogswell1 indicates that homografts of skin in man are generally unsuccessful. Even grafts that appear to adhere and grow for several weeks later slough.

Since it was observed2 that young rats supplied some successful "takes" to older hosts, it was thought that homografts which had persisted for a year were of interest and deserved description. Possibly the compatibility that resulted in these transplants may be attributed to the use of inbred Wistar rats. Loeb and King,3 however, found that inbreeding in rats did not decrease the intensity of the reaction of the host against transplanted organs.

Frequently autotransplants are successful in man, but in all probability there have been few occasions to graft skin to the scalp; thus there has been limited opportunity to observe the growth of hair on transplants. Few observations have also been made on other mammals over

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