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Article
July 1937

SPECIFIC TREATMENT OF STAPHYLOCOCCIC INFECTIONS OF THE SKIN

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;36(1):106-115. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01480010110016
Abstract

Staphylococci were observed by many workers during the latter part of the last century. Billroth in 1874, according to the "British System of Bacteriology,"1 took precedence in the recognition of this organism and of its association with suppurating pathologic lesions. Ogston in 1883 introduced the name Staphylococcus, because of the morphologic characteristics of the organism. Rosenbach in 1884 divided the group into two types—the pigment-producing and the nonpigment-producing strains. That the staphylococcus elaborated a soluble principle both in vivo and in vitro was first demonstrated by Van de Velde in 1894, who called this soluble principle leukocidin and stated that it possessed not only the property to destroy leukocytes but that to destroy tissue cells as well. Van de Velde also, in 1895, observed that the normal blood serum contained protective properties against leukocidin and that the injection of broth cultures of staphylococci into experimental rabbits caused the elaboration

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