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Article
August 1937

AN EARLY SIGN OF LATENT ALLERGY IN INFANTS

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;36(2):342-343. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01480020098015
Abstract

Allergic diseases have their prodromal manifestations; there are distinctive premonitory signs by which the supervention of allergy can be foretold. But these forewarnings occur too late to permit arrest of the disturbance. Once a child has suffered from some form of allergy, however, subsequent recognition becomes less difficult. There are, thus far, no pathognomonic signs or symptoms characteristic of the allergic child, despite the fact that latent constitutional hypersensitiveness may be manifest. Heredity requires considerable probing before it can be used as corroborative evidence. The difficulty of recognizing allergy early is greatest in the case of infants, as in infancy ill defined conditions are usually atypical in their manifestations. A hairless, scaly scalp or a desquamated dry skin is a helpful, but an inconstant, sign for determining allergy in the new-born.

A rather constant concomitant of latent allergy in infants is a retroauricular intertrigo. It is usually not recognized until

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