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Article
September 1937

MAPHARSEN IN THE TREATMENT OF SYPHILIS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND; LINCOLN, NEB.

From the Departments of Dermatology and Syphilology of the Western Reserve University School of Medicine and of the University Hospital and the City Hospital, Cleveland.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;36(3):561-580. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01480030088010
Abstract

The trivalent arsenical preparation meta-aminoparahydroxyphenylarsine oxide was studied originally by Ehrlich and Bertheim and later by Voegtlin and others. Ehrlich and Hata1 found its therapeutic index to be less than that of the arsphenamines. Voegtlin2 considered arsenoxide for clinical use in the treatment of syphilis but hesitated because its margin of safety as established by the chemotherapeutic index appeared to be somewhat lower than that of arsphenamine. The attention of chemotherapeutists was again called to arsenoxide as the result of the experiments of Tatum and Cooper.3 These investigators found that the therapeutic index and other properties were such as to make the drug more promising than any other single antisyphilitic agent. Gruhzit,4 in studies on experimental trypanosomiasis and syphilis, found that arsenoxide was well tolerated and possessed a therapeutic value at least as high as that of neoarsphenamine.

Mapharsen is meta-aminoparahydroxyphenylarsine oxide hydrochloride, generally known by

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