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Article
November 1937

DEMONSTRATION OF PEMPHIGUS TOXIN IN FRESH AND IN DRY BLOOD

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE

From the Pharmacological Research Laboratory, Hynson, Westcott & Dunning, Inc.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;36(5):1022-1032. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01480050088012
Abstract

INTRODUCTION  In previous papers I have described the results of the phytopharmacologic examination of various body fluids, toxins and chemicals and have pointed out that blood, blood serum and blood plasma from normal subjects exhibit a slight toxicity for roots of Lupinus albus seedlings grown under carefully controlled plant-physiologic conditions.1 Such seedlings, grown in solutions of blood serum and blood plasma from normal subjects (obtained with highly purified heparin), yielded a phytotoxic index of from 70 to 75 per cent, as compared with that of control seedlings grown in normal plant-physiologic solution alone. Lupinus seedlings grown in whole blood, either laked or kept fluid with heparin, gave phytotoxic indexes ranging from 65 to 70 per cent. When similar methods were applied to the study of specimens of blood from patients with various diseases, it was found that specimens of serum from patients with most pathologic conditions exhibited little

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