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Article
December 1937

SENSE OF SMELL OF PATIENTS WITH NEUROSYPHILIS, ESPECIALLY OF THOSE WITH DEMENTIA PARALYTICA

Author Affiliations

NORTHAMPTON, MASS.

From the Northampton State Hospital.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1937;36(6):1181-1184. doi:10.1001/archderm.1937.01480060054008
Abstract

Since the discovery of the organism of syphilis by Schaudinn and Hoffmann in 1905, a vast amount of literature has accumulated on pathologic changes in the nerves in syphilis, yet there seems to be but scant reference to syphilis of the olfactory system. Just why this phase of syphilology has been insufficiently studied is difficult to explain, especially when one recalls that the gyrus rectus and the gyrus orbitalis of the frontal portion of the brain are the sites most frequently invaded by the organism.1

It is interesting that the sense of smell is frequently not tested during a neurologic examination. It may be that because of the large surface of the brain to be examined (this surface was calculated by Pulcher2 to be 2,200 sq. cm.) the olfactory system is often examined only macroscopically. Regarding microscopic examination, F. Jahnel stated ". . . in careful examinations for spirochaetes in the

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