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Article
June 1938

SIGNIFICANCE IN DERMATOLOGY OF THE VIRUS DISEASES AND THEIR ORGANISMS

Author Affiliations

BONN, GERMANY

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1938;37(6):937-946. doi:10.1001/archderm.1938.01480120003001
Abstract

Under virus diseases or viroses it is customary now to group numerous infectious diseases which are caused by small filtrable organisms.1 Some of these once invisible micro-organisms, such as Paschen's elementary corpuscles,2 are now, however, visible. In the last edition of my textbook the following are grouped together as virus diseases: measles, scarlet fever (plus streptococci), rubeola, erythema infectiosum, herpes simplex, herpes zoster, lymphogranuloma venereum, lymphogranulomatosis (Hodgkin's disease), foot and mouth disease, variola, varicella, molluscum contagiosum, warts, venereal papilloma and pemphigus (?). The importance in dermatology of the granular organisms which I have termed granulozoa is emphasized in a special chapter on viroses.

After Loeffler and Frosch (both students of Robert Koch) proved in 1897 for the first time that these organisms were filtrable, an attempt was made by zoologists, particularly by Schaudinn and von Prowazek, to demonstrate the existence of these organisms in the lesions of smallpox

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