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Article
November 1938

SYCOSIS PARASITICA DUE TO FAVOTRICHOPHYTON ALBUM VAR. SINGULARE

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology and the Institute of Pathology of the School of Medicine, Western Reserve University.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1938;38(5):756-772. doi:10.1001/archderm.1938.01480170080009
Abstract

Sycosis parasitica is relatively rare in the United States (Ormsby1). During the past fourteen years we have observed only 4 cases. In 3 instances fungi of the Trichophyton gypseum group were isolated; cultures from the fourth patient yielded a faviform organism. All these dermatophytes are of animal origin. The history of all 4 patients showed that they had handled infected livestock.

It would be surprising if, with the large number of cattle in this country, dermatomycoses of animal origin should be rare. It is more probable that such infections occur chiefly among the agricultural population and do not reach the metropolitan medical centers, where cultural studies can be made. Giltner2 stated: . . . As regards cattle, ringworm is widespread throughout the United States, the young being most frequently affected. Ringworm infection in sheep is apparently quite rare in this country. Our records show only one case which was encountered some

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