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Article
February 1939

CIRCUMCISION IN TREATMENT OF CHANCROIDAL LESIONS OF MALE GENITALIA: FURTHER OBSERVATIONS

Author Affiliations

CLEVELAND

From the Department of Dermatology and Syphilology of the Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and from the Cleveland City Hospital, service of Drs. H. N. Cole and J. R. Driver.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1939;39(2):319-328. doi:10.1001/archderm.1939.01480200126012
Abstract

In 1929 a group of 537 cases of lesions diagnosed as chancroidal infections of the male genitalia was reported from the dermatologic service of the Cleveland City Hospital.1 These cases were all those of penile chancroidal infection observed for a period of four and a half years (July 1924 to January 1929).

In an effort to decrease the length of stay in the hospital and to reduce the incidence of complicating suppurative inguinal adenitis, which occurred in at least 50 per cent of the patients before or during hospitalization, an attempt was directed toward increasing peripheral drainage and exposing inaccessible lesions by circumcision.

Ricord2 in 1858 abrogated circumcision in the management of chancroidal infection. Aubert3 in 1882 lent his support to the contrary view, claiming that healing by first intention frequently occurred in patients with chancroids who were circumcised. Salsotto4 in 1892 circumcised 5 such patients;

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