[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 1939

SENSITIVENESS OF SKIN TO ROENTGEN RAYS FOLLOWING INGESTION OF ARSENIC

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

From the Division of Dermatology, University of Minnesota, H. E. Michelson, M.D., Director; and the Dermatology Service, Minneapolis General Hospital, S. E. Sweitzer, M.D., Chief.

Arch Derm Syphilol. 1939;39(3):518-526. doi:10.1001/archderm.1939.01480210133015
Abstract

Several years ago, at a meeting of the Minnesota Dermatological Society, the therapy of superficial cutaneous epithelioma was discussed. One of the members expressed the opinion that epithelioma following the ingestion of arsenic and containing abnormally large amounts of arsenic was extremely resistant to radiotherapy. Somewhat later one of us encountered extraordinarily severe cutaneous reactions following roentgen therapy to several superficial epitheliomas in a patient with psoriasis who had ingested solution of potassium arsenite over a period of years and who had, in addition to multiple malignant growths, arsenical keratoses on the palms and soles. These events stimulated interest in the question of whether arsenic in any way influenced the radiosensitiveness of the skin.

Judging from the extremely few references in the literature to the relation of arsenic to radiosensitiveness, one might infer that if arsenic had any material effect on the reactivity of the skin to irradiation the problem

×